Diabetic Feet Issues

Persistent unilateral (one -sided) swelling of feet can be a sign of serious damage to the bones and joints of his feet and needs to be shown to a doctor immediately. If the foot wear is worn out at particular place, it is indicative of extra pressure being applied at that area of the foot and needs to be shown to the doctor at the earliest. While traveling, one must not remove his/her footwear and rest the feet on the floor of the vehicle. No amount of drugs/medicines can keep a patient's feet intact unless the patient is wearing properly designed footwear. All foot wear must always be worn with socks. It is necessary to avoid direct contact between the footwear and skin. Socks also help in reducing the damage to the skin of the fore foot. The heel of the foot should be completely supported by FULL HEEL COUNTER. Diabetic neuroischemic foot.Plantar Fasciitis,Pes Planus,Mallet Toe,High Arched Feet,Heel Spur,Heel Pain,Hammer Toe,Hallux Valgus,Foot Pain,Foot Hard Skin,Foot Conditions,Foot Callous,Flat Feet,Fallen Arches,Diabetic Foot,Contracted Toe,Claw Toe,Bunions Hard Skin,Bunions Callous,Bunion Pain,Ball Of Foot Pain,Back PainPlantar Fasciitis,Pes Planus,Mallet Toe,High Arched Feet,Heel Spur,Heel Pain,Hammer Toe,Hallux Valgus,Foot Pain,Foot Hard Skin,Foot Conditions,Foot Callous,Flat Feet,Fallen Arches,Diabetic Foot,Contracted Toe,Claw Toe,Bunions Hard Skin,Bunions Callous,Bunion Pain,Ball Of Foot Pain,Back Pain

Your doctor may recommend that you avoid intense, high-impact activities such as running because of the potential for foot injury. Give your feet a thorough going-over every night to make sure that you haven't developed a sore, blister, cut, scrape, or any other tiny problem that could blow up into big trouble. If your vision isn't good or you have trouble reaching your feet, have someone check your feet for you.

The infected bone may be very painful, and the skin above the bone can become red and swollen. The Cleveland Clinic explains that many diabetics experience a patchy loss of bone in their fingers, feet and toes. People with type 1 diabetes (which is also known as childhood diabetes and affects patients early in their lives) also have an increased risk of osteoporosis. As the bones get more brittle they become prone to miniature fractures, which may not be as obvious as a complete fracture but which can cause severe bone pain nonetheless.

Around 50% of our patients sought care due to wounds that had grown too large for home management. For them to take care of themselves, we needed padding readily available for all diabetics and easy to use; something patients could pick up at the drugstore. It also needed to be user friendly; I couldn't have my diabetic patients carving away at foam with a scalpel! Having this variety of shapes is important, as each wound is shaped differently and irregularly, and the padding must be applied to the borders of the wound, no matter where on the foot the wound is located.

The prevalence of peripheral vascular disease was 15%, hallux vulgus was 22.5%, inappropriate foot wear was 41%, and peripheral neuropathy was 47.5%. Peripheral neuropathy and inappropriate foot wear were the most common risk factors for foot ulceration. Foot ulceration, secondary to diabetes, is the most common reason for lower limb amputation, accounting for 50-70% of non-traumatic lower limb amputations. Rather than progressing through the usual wound healing phases, diabetic wounds become ‘stuck', predominantly in the inflammatory phase. Chronic diabetic wounds always have a bacterial load, and the increased tissue bacterial burden may impede healing. This review seeks to examine factors that prevent diabetic wound healing and the potential of four bee products to promote diabetic human healing in these wounds. Anyone who has diabetes can develop a foot ulcer.

Drink at least 64 oz. of fluid each day to prevent dry skin and cracks. Diabetics are more likely to become dehydrated than those with stable blood glucose levels, which means a greater Pes Planus intake of water is necessary to keep the skin hydrated. The University of Iowa recommends wearing shoes at all times to prevent injury and infection of open sores or cracks.